Global Child Health

Global Child Health

Global_Health.jpgIn March 2015, the Pediatric Residency Program at Our Lady of the Lake dedicated itself to the development of a Global Child Health section within the residency.  The section has worked to support the pediatric trainee’s general education by 1) providing a core of global child health education for all residents and 2) developing safe, formalized international health electives (IHEs) for those residents with expressed interest.
    
Currently, there are quarterly Global Child Health lectures intertwined within the standard Pediatric Residency Program (PRP) educational curriculum.  These include topics such as: State of the World’s Children, Malnutrition, Oral Rehydration and Diarrhea, Maternal-Neonatal Health, and Refugee Health.  Residents who choose to pursue international health electives during the final year and a half of residency are individually mentored in site selection, preparation, and international health advocacy.
    
We have our first formalized international health partnership with a rural faith-based hospital in Honduras.  At this location, our residents are immersed in outpatient pediatrics in a low-resource setting, mother-baby care and mobile clinics to the outlying villages.  We are committed to supporting our partner-hospital in their own quality assessment and improvement projects and scholarships are available to those residents who show specific dedication to serving our partner hospitals in these scholarly endeavors.
    
Moving forward, we intend to establish an ACGME approved Global Child Health Track (GCHT) to uniquely prepare pediatricians who are committed to life-long involvement in pediatrics across the globe whether as career medical missionaries or academic global health leaders.  The GCHT will overlap with the Primary Care Track as we train residents to medically serve and advocate for the most vulnerable populations in lower-resourced areas of Louisiana.  We intend to nurture a generation of pediatricians who are committed to caring for the underserved at home and abroad.

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